Mateo Donet. La Ejecución de los Mártires Cristianos en el Imperio Romano. 2016.

La Ejecución de los Mártires Cristianos en el Imperio Romano

 

M.ª Amparo Mateo Donet
ISBN: 978-84-944757-4-0
DL: MU 34-2016
299 páginas
Publicado: 1-1-2016

Resumen:

Los primeros siglos del cristianismo fueron designados como la era de las persecuciones debido a los continuos procesos que se llevaron a cabo contra sus miembros por parte del Imperio romano. La crueldad extrema y la extravagancia en los suplicios han sido consideradas las características definitorias de tales sucesos; sin embargo, la realidad fue muy distinta. A través de los textos de los Padres de la Iglesia y especialmente de la literatura hagiográfica se abordan los tipos de ejecución y tortura a que fueron sometidos los mártires cristianos en el contexto de la sociedad romana –desde los denominados summa supplicia (crucifixión, cremación, condena a las bestias) hasta los considerados privilegiados (decapitación, exilio), pasando por aquellos equiparados a ordalías y los que implicaban una muerte indirecta (precipitación, envío a minas)-, para ofrecer una visión definitiva sobre el desarrollo de estos acontecimientos en la Antigüedad.

La autora: Amparo Mateo Donet es licenciada en Historia por la Universidad de Valencia, donde también se doctoró en Historia Antigua en 2014, con la tesis a partir de cuyos resultados se publica la presente monografía y por la que recibió un premio de la Fundación Pastor de Estudios Clásicos el mismo año.
Trabaja desde 2008 en el Dpto. de Historia de la Antigüedad y la Cultura Escrita (Universidad de Valencia) mediante contratos de becas predoctoral y postdoctoral, concedidas por la Generalitat Valenciana, que continúa hasta la actualidad. Asimismo ha realizado estancias en centros de investigación en el extranjero, principalmente en el Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum de Roma.
Es autora de numerosos artículos referentes a temas de Historia Antigua de Roma y Cristianismo primitivo, publicados en diversas revistas científicas nacionales e internacionales.

Libro disponible en la página web del CEPOAT – Universidad de Murcia.

Le Nain de Tillemont. Mémoires pour servir a l’histoire écclésiastique des six premiers siècles. (Published:) 1693-1712.

Mémoires pour servir a l’histoire écclésiastique des six premiers siècles,

justifiez par les citations des auteurs originaux,

avec une chronologie où l’on fait un abrégé de l’histoire ecclésiastique et profane

et des notes pour éclaircir les difficultez des faits et de la chronologie

Published: 1693-1712.
Volumes: 16
Publisher Paris : C. Robustel
Language French
Call number BX 167 .L43 1701
Digitizing sponsor University of Ottawa
Book contributor University of Ottawa
Collection universityofottawa; toronto

The success of this great work (Histoire des Empereurs) was immediate from the appearance of the first volume and led to a demand for the publication of the Histoire ecclésiastique. Boucherat, Chancelier of France, employed his influence. A new censor was appointed and permission was granted. Before publication, however, strong pressure was exerted on Tillemont to reorganize his work and arrange his material in the form of Annals. In refusing to make the change, he offered his Histoire to another or others who would be willing to rework it in the manner desired, but no one accepted the offer. Volume I was published in 1693. Its title reads : Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire ecclésiastique des six premiers siècles, justifiez par les citations des auteurs originaux, avec une chronologie où l’on fait un abrégé de l’histoire ecclésiastique et profane et des notes pour éclaircir les difficultez des faits et de la chronologie. Volumes II (1694), III (1695), and IV (1696) were prepared for the press by Tillemont himself.
Volumes V-XVI (1698-1712) were given their final preparation by Tronchay. Volume XIII, which contains the life of St. Augustine, appeared after VII, because the Latin vita published by the Maurists in their great edition of St. Augustine was a translation into Latin of the French original written by Tillemont, and it was thought desirable to make the French original available to the public as soon as possible.

Martin R. P. McGuire, ‘Louis-Sebastien le Nain de Tillemont’. The Catholic Historical Review, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jul., 1966), pp. 194-195.

mmoirespourser01lena_0005

16 Volumes available through Scribd.

16 Volumes available through the Bibliotheca Pretiosa.

Robinson. Texts and studies: contributions to Biblical and Patristic literature. Volume 1. 1891.

Previously announced here, the 4 issues of the first volume has been published by Internet Archive, and may be now accessed through the Bibliotheca Pretiosa and Scribd too.

3 items has been digitized at full color, and one of them [THE PASSION OF S. PERPETUA] is available only as microfilm, in b/w images.

The handwritten note in the front-cover of the issue 4 was done not to correct an ‘errata’, but as a misplaced warning to help the readers. The back-cover show that a single page is attached to the 4th. issue, as a main front-page of the whole volume 1; that’s the reason the 4 issues appear listed there:

Vol. I.

No. 1. THE APOLOGY OF ARISTIDES : by J. Rendel Harris, M. A. : with an Appendix by the editor.
No. 2. THE PASSION OF S. PERPETUA, with an Appendix on the Scillitan Martyrdom : by the editor.
No. 3. THE LORD’S PRAYER IN THE EARLY CHURCH : by F. H. Chase, B. D.
No. 4. THE FRAGMENTS OF HERACLEON : by A. E. Brooke, M. A.

Harris, Robinson. The Apology of Aristides on behalf of the Christians : from a Syriac ms. preserved on Mou… by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Robinson. The Passion of S. Perpetua [microform]. 1891. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Chase. The Lord's prayer in the early church. 1891. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Robinson. Texts and studies : contributions to Biblical and Patristic literature. 1891. Volume 1. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

De Aldama. Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística. 1963.

Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística (1963)

Author: Aldama, José Antonio de
Subject: Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Fathers of the church
Publisher: Granada, Facultad de Teología
Language: Spanish
Call number: BT612 .A355
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: majorityworldcollection; Princeton; americana

De Aldama. Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística. 1963. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Quote. Robert M. Grant. ‘Early Christians and Animals’, Ch. 4, “Alexandrians and the Phisiologus”, 3: Clement. 1999.

The primary work of Clement of Alexandria, in eight books, was his Stromateis or Miscellanies. Like Aelian, he used a good source (an epitome of Aristotle’s History of Animals by Aristophanes of Byzantium), but added a good deal of erudite nonsense. As an Alexandrian, Clement is naturally concerned with Egyptian matters. He refers to “the gods of Egypt such as cats and weasels,” as well as “cat or crocodile or native snake.” On a literary level he analyzes Egyptian writing as epistolographic (= demotic) or hieratic or hieroglyphic. There are two kinds of hieroglyphs, literal and symbolical, while the symbolical in turn is divided into three: (1) literal by imitation (the sun is a circle, the moon looks like a moon), (2) figurative, and (3) allegorical using enigmas. He illustrates the third type by stars depicted as snakes because of their oblique orbits, the sun as a beetle because it fashions a ball of ox-dung and rolls it before its face. Later he discusses the symbolical meanings of animals in the hieroglyphs. Some Egyptians show the sun on a ship, others on a crocodile; they mean that the sun generates time, or else that the crocodile symbolizes time. On the sacred Pylon at Diospolis there was a boy, the symbol of generation, and an old man, decay. A hawk was the symbol of God, a fish of hatred, while the crocodile can mean shamelessness. Taken together, the symbols mean this: “You who are born and die, God hates shamelessness.” (This last account is close to Plutarch, except that he locates the carving in the temple of Athena at Sais and identifies the shameless animal as the hippopotamus.) In addition, the lion symbolizes strength and vigor; the ox, agriculture and nourishment; the horse, courage and boldness; the sphinx, strength with understanding, for it has the body of a lion, the face of a man. A man symbolizes intelligence, memory, power, and art. In the processions of the gods they carry gold images: two dogs, one hawk, and one ibis. The dogs symbolize two hemispheres; the hawk the sun, the ibis the moon; or else the dogs are the tropics, the hawk the equinoctial line, and the ibis the ecliptic. The errors in this exegesis are comparable only to those in the Hieroglyphics of Horapollo, who wrote several centuries after Clement, but relied on similar sources. Both authors took the symbols seriously but did not know what they meant.

When Clement attacked anthropomorphists who held that God literally enjoys smelling the smoke of sacrifices (Gen. 8:21), he turned to natural history for analogies. Do insects breathe or not? Clement marshalled a scientific account of breathing, to combat the idea that God breathes. Aristotle (On Respiration) had argued that insects do not breathe because when centipedes are cut up the parts stay alive, and flies and bees can swim in liquid for a long time. On the other hand, in his History of Animals he noted that all insects die if covered with oil, a point suggesting that they do breathe. Clement deals with the question by defining terms. Plants are nourished from the density of the air, while hibernating bears are nourished from the exhalation arising from their own bodies. Demons ventilate internally (diapneitai). Fish inhale (empneitai) through the dilation of their gills. Insects circumspire (peripneitai) through pressure of membranes on the waist. Finally, there are creatures that inhale (anapnei) by rhythmic beats corresponding to the counter-dilation (anti-diastole) of the lungs against the chest. A little later, Clement notes that land animals and birds inhale as human beings do, though fish breathe the air infused into the water at the creation. Theophilus too had remarked on this infusion.

Clement dealt with diet from points of view both moral and philosophical. He quoted Paul as saying, “It is good not to eat meat or drink wine” (shortened from Romans 14:21), in agreement with the Pythagoreans – for whose opinions he quotes the Stoic Musonius Rufus: “meat, though appropriate for wild animals, darkens the soul.” He adds, however, that he who eats meat sparingly does not sin. In his view the best diet consists of bulbs, olives, herbs, milk, cheese, fruits, and “all kinds of cooked food without sauces.” (The list comes from Plato through Plutarch.) But Clement is willing to include meat, preferably roasted, not boiled. He cites the frugal disciples, who offered the risen Lord “a piece of broiled fish, which he ate before them” (Luke 24:42–43).

In a later work Clement reflects deeper concerns. Christians can abstain from meat on reasonable grounds, not the Pythagorean dream about the transmigration of souls. One might abstain because animal meat has “already been assimilated to the souls of irrational creatures.” In addition, wine and meat harm the mind, as (the Pythagorean) Androcydes said. Similarly one of the late second-century Sayings of Sextus, authoritative for both Clement and Origen, claims that though abstinence is more rational, eating animate beings is really a matter of indifference.

Egyptian priests in their purifications abstain from meat and fish, for “such food makes the flesh flabby.” Elsewhere Clement lists a few fishes “venerated” at various places: one kind at Syene, another at Elephantine, yet another at Oxyrhynchus. This kind of information reflects the interests of the age, not those of Christians generally save for the literary-minded author himself.

He also tells how some Phoenician Syrians “venerate” fishes, while Porphyry mentions Syrians in general, as well as initiates into the mysteries at Eleusis. The Christian apologist Athenagoras says Syrians “venerate” fish because of the mythical Derceto (who had a fish’s tail). “Venerate” again means “not eat.”

Clement identifies the serpent with the devil but usually, after Philo, relates his work to pleasure. He adds that the serpent is now the cause of idol-worship, and acts like barbarians who bind their captives to corpses. The simile comes from the Exhortation of Aristotle, but Clement obviously makes it his own.

Since Clement knew something of zoology he could question animal lore, either tacitly or explicitly. In his Miscellanies he paraphrases much of the letter of “the apostle Clement,” but not the section about the phoenix, a bird he mentions elsewhere only as an Egyptian astrological symbol. Presumably he did not accept the story. When he commented on Barnabas, whom he regarded as an apostle, he relied on Aristotle for questioning the story about the hyena, though without naming either the apostle or the philosopher. He agreed with Barnabas that Moses spoke allegorically but rejected his ideas about what he meant. “I do not agree with this exegesis of what was said symbolically.” Closer to Aristotle than to Barnabas, Clement says the hare really has a bifurcated uterus. And as for the weasel, the Hellenistic Jewish Epistle of Aristeas said that the weasel conceives through the ear and gives birth through the mouth; Plutarch states that “many suppose and say that the weasel conceives through the ear and gives birth through the mouth.” Harnack and others thought Zeno of Verona was expressing a like thought when he said that “Christ enters Mary through the ear.” They did not notice that Zeno was simply giving allegorical exegesis of the angel’s speaking a word to her, just as when he said that the devil crept into Eve through her ear. This was not Barnabas’ notion. The author of the Clementine Recognitions rather sensibly supposed that these unusual habits prove that the Creator specifically chose the usual modes of conception and birth as norms. The Physiologus, as usual, went back to gossip, claiming that the hyena is androgynous, alternating sexes, while the weasel conceives through the mouth and gives birth through the ears. The latter statement simply reverses Aristeas’ notion.

Robert M. Grant. ‘Early Christians and Animals’, Ch. 4, “Alexandrians and the Phisiologus”, 3: Clement, pp. 46.48. Routledge, 1999.

Vizmanos. Las vírgenes cristianas de la iglesia primitiva : estudio histórico-ideológico seguido de una antología de tratados patrísticos sobre la virginidad. 1949.

Las vírgenes cristianas de la iglesia primitiva : estudio histórico-ideológico seguido de una antología de tratados patrísticos sobre la virginidad (1949)

Author: Vizmanos, Francisco de B
Subject: Virginity; Christian literature, Early
Publisher: Madrid : La Editoral Católica
Language: Spanish
Call number: BV4647.C5 V46 1949
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: Princeton; americana

NOTE: Please be aware that this item may have legal restrictions in some countries. If possible, verify your current legislation about Copyright’ laws, to determinate if this item may be accessed from your country.

Vizmanos. Las vírgenes cristianas de la iglesia primitiva : estudio histórico-ideológico seguido de una ant… by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Porcel. La doctrina monástica de San Gregorio Magno y la “Regula monachorum”. 1950.

La doctrina monástica de San Gregorio Magno y la “Regula monachorum” (1950)

Author: Porcel, Olegario Maria, 1914-
Subject: Gregory I, Pope, ca. 540-604; Benedict, Saint, Abbot of Monte Cassino; Monasticism and religious orders
Publisher: [Madrid] : Instituto “Enrique Florez,” Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, [1950]
Language: Spanish
Call number: BX1076 .P67 1950
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: Princeton; americana

Porcel. La doctrina monástica de San Gregorio Magno y la "Regula monachorum". 1950. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Grützmacher. Hieronymus : eine biographische Studie zur alten Kirchengeschichte. 1901.

Hieronymus : eine biographische Studie zur alten Kirchengeschichte (August 1901)

Author: Grützmacher, Georg, 1866-
Volumes: 3
Subject: Jerome, Saint, d. 419 or 20; Church history
Publisher: Leipzig : Dieterich
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT
Language: German
Call number: AEQ-0286
Digitizing sponsor: msn
Book contributor: Robarts – University of Toronto
Collection: robarts; toronto

Grützmacher. Hieronymus : eine biographische Studie zur alten Kirchengeschichte. 1901. Volume 1. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Grützmacher. Hieronymus : eine biographische Studie zur alten Kirchengeschichte. 1901. Volume 2. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Grützmacher. Hieronymus : eine biographische Studie zur alten Kirchengeschichte. 1901. Volume 3. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Montalembert. Les moines d’Occident depuis Saint Benoít jusqu’a Saint Bernard/The monks of the West, from St. Benedict to St. Bernard. 1878/1861.

A member of the French Academy from 9 January, 1851 Montalembert was both an orator and a historian. As early as 1835 he had planned to write a life of St. Bernard. He was led to publish in 1860, under the title “Les Moines d’Occident”, two volumes on the origin of monasticism; then followed three volumes on the monks in England; he died before he reached the period of St. Bernard. But he left among his papers, on the one hand, a manuscript entitled “Influence de l’ordre monastique sur la noblesse féodale et la société laïque jusqu’à la fin du XIe siàcle”, and on the other hand a work on Gregory VII and the conflict of investitures; and these two manuscripts, published in 1877 by his friend Foisset and his son-in-law the Vicomte de Meaux, made up the sixth and seventh volume of the “Moines d’Occident”.

Goyau, G. (1911). Comte de Montalembert. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10513b.htm


 

Les moines d’Occident depuis Saint Benoít jusqu’a Saint Bernard (1878)

Author: Montalembert, Charles Forbes, comte de, 1810-1870; Courson, Aurélien, comte de, 1811-1889
Volumes: 7
Subject: Monasticism and religious orders
Publisher: Paris : Lecoffre
Year: 1878
Language: French
Call number: AAM6654
Digitizing sponsor: Brigham Young University
Book contributor: Harold B. Lee Library
Collection: americana

 


The monks of the West, from St. Benedict to St. Bernard (1861)

Author: Montalembert, Charles Forbes, comte de, 1810-1870; Courson, Aurélien, comte de, 1811-1889, ed
Volumes: 7
Subject: Monasticism and religious orders
Publisher: Edinburgh and London, W. Blackwood and sons
Language: English
Call number: BX2461 .M76
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: Princeton; americana

Description
Original French edition published Paris, 1860-77, v. 6-7 being edited by Aurelien de Courson
–v. 1. Dedication. Introduction. book I. The Roman empire after the peace of the church. book II. Monastic precursors in the East. book III. Monastic precursors in the West. 1861.
–v. 2. book iv. St. Benedict. book v. St. Gregory the Great. Monastic Italy and Spain in the sixth and seventh centuries. book VI. The monks under the first Merovingians. book VII. St. Columbanus. The Irish in Gaul and the colonies of Luxeuil. 1861.
–v. 3. book VIII. Christian origin of the British Isles. book IX. St. Columba, the apostle of Caledonia, 521-597. book X. St. Augustin of Canterbury and the Roman missionaries in England, 597-633. Appendix: Iona. Conclusions of the two papers of M. Varin. 1867.
–v. 4. book XI. The Celtic monks and the Anglo-Saxons. book XII. St. Wilfrid establishes Roman unity and the Benedictine order, 634-709. book XIII. Contemporaries and successors of St. Wilfrid, 650-735. Appendix: Lindisfarne. Peterborough. Hexham. 1867.
–v. 5. Conclusion of book XIII. book XIV. Social and political influence of the monks among the Anglo-Saxons. book XV. the Anglo-Saxon nuns. 1867.
–v.6. book XVIII. The church and the feudal system. The monastic orders and society. book XIX St. Gregory, monk and pope, Appendix. 1879.
–v.7. book XIX continued. book XX. The predecessors of Calixtus II. 1879

 

Both editions available via:

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Roisselet de Sauclières. Histoire chronologique et dogmatique des conciles de la chrétienté. 1844.

Histoire chronologique et dogmatique des conciles de la chrétienté : depuis le concile de Jérusalem… jusqu’au dernier concile tenu de nos jours. (1844)

Author: Roisselet de Sauclières ; fils
Subject: Conciles et synodes — Histoire ; Église — Histoire
Publisher: Paul Mellier
Year: 1844
Language: French
Collection: bibliothequesaintegenevieve, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek

This work, divided in 6 volumes, is available through the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek. The 6 volumes are in B/W, and the size of each one surpasses the 150 Mb.

Internet Archive digitized only 3 volumes, belonging to the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, whose sizes +400Mb each one, and were digitized in full color.

The links to access these contents are:

Histoire chronologique et dogmatique des conciles de la chrétienté : depuis le concile de Jérusalem… jusqu’au dernier concile tenu de nos jours. (1845) :

http://archive.org/details/8DSUP26064_1

http://archive.org/details/8DSUP26064_2

http://archive.org/details/8DSUP26064_3

Histoire chronologique et dogmatique des conciles de la chrétienté, BSB:

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10393545-5

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10393546-1

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10393547-6

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10393547-6

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10479962-1

http://www.mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn=urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb10393548-2

Moroni. Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da S. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni. 1840.

DIZIONARIO

DI ERUDIZIONE

STORICO-ECCLESIASTICA

DA S. PIETRO SINO AI NOSTRI GIORNI

SPECIALMENTE INTORNO

AI PRINCIPALI SANTI, BEATI, MARTIRI, PADRI, AI SOMMI PONTEFICI, CARDINALI E PIÚ CELEBRO SCRITTORI ECCLESIASTICI, AI VARII GRADI DELLA GERARCHIA DELLA CHIESA CATTOLICA, ALLE CITTÁ PATRIARCALI, ARCIVESCOVILI E VESCOVILI, AGLI SCISMI, ALLE ERESIE, AI CONCILII, ALLE FESTE PIÚ SOLENNI, AI RITI, ALLE CEREMONIE SACRE, ALLE CAPPELLE PAPALI, CARDINALIZIE E PRELATIZIE, AGLI ORDINI RELIGIOSI, MILITARI, EQUESTRI ED OSPITALIERI, NON CHE ALLA CORTE ROMANA ED ALLA FAMIGLIA PONTIFICIA, EC. E. EC.

COMPILAZIONE

DI GAETANO MORONI ROMANO

PRIMO AIUTANTE DI CAMERA DI S. S.

IN VENEZIA
DALLA TIPOGRAFIA EMILIANA
MDCCCXL.

Non presunzione di farsi maestro al colto pubblico, o vanità di occupar posto fra gli autori, muovono GAETANO MORONI, primo aiutante di camera di Sua Santità, a dare in luce questa sua Compilazione. Sentimento di patria, e riverente affetto di suddito, gli fecero assai caro sino dalla età verde lo studio di quanto alla Chiesa cattolica romana si appartiene, ed ogni maniera di libro erudito intorno la capitale del cattolico mondo.

Per mettere a profitto letture di tanta importanza, il Moroni si fece annotatore, formando nel periodo di oltre a venti anni repertori, sunti, giornali storici, pratici, e di ceremonie. Quindi ei divideali in disparati articoli, che ammontarono a parecchie migliaia ; al qual lavoro aggiunse dappoi notizie ed aneddoti, che nella posizione sua potè in gran copia raccogliere, e da molte moderne opere ancora ritrarre. Fatto ciò, quanto per lui si è potuto accuratamente, si avvide che il lavoro avrebbe presentato le materie di un quadro di notizie ecclesiastiche, e della influenza che in diciotto secoli ebbe la Romana Chiesa sul resto del mondo. E però gli parve bene ridurre il tutto a foggia di Dizionario, col solo desiderio di rivolgere a comodo degli studiosi il frutto delle sue letture, ed osservazioni.

Con questo intendimento si determinò il Moroni di render pubblico per le stampe quanto avea per suo privato uso raccolto, intitolando la sua Compilazione: Dizionario di Erudizione Storico-Ecclesiaslica, da s. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni, ec. ec. ec.

Se il dotto non avrà in mal grado di fermarvi l’ occhio sopra, non si dorrà per avventura di richiamare alla memoria cose a lui note. A chi poi fosse meno addentro nella erudizione, goderà l’ animo di trovar all’uopo raccolte in una sola opera, estesa per ordine alfabetico, ciò che in molte e molte dovrebbe investigare a grande fatica.

La serie cronologica dei Papi procederà in questo Dizionario con quella dal Burio adottata, e proseguita dal Novaes nelle Vite dei Pontefici. Si è conservata la denominazione latina delle diocesi abbreviata giusta l’uso di Roma. Oltracciò vuolsi avvertire, che per distinguere tra le città patriarcali, arcivescovili e vescovili, quelle che hanno anche di presente il rispettivo diocesano da quelle che hanno cessato di averlo, l’autore ha indicato le prime colle parole con residenza, alla qual distinzione tien dietro un’altra dei vescovati in partibus. Quanto è alle città che hanno relazione con la ecclesiastica storia, si riportano quelle dove si celebrarono concilii , e le capitali, non omesse in gran parte le famiglie donde venne alla Santa Sede qualche successore di s. Pietro. Nello scegliere le biografie degli scrittori ecclesiastici , il compilatore si è attenuto al catalogo del Berti, facendo menzione anche dei più distinti a lui posteriori.

Collection available through the Bibliotheca Pretiosa.

Documents. CSCO at Internet Archive.

In the last months, the Internet Archive service has been adding spared items from the CSCO.

They belong to different series, and do not have -at the present- a serial order.

The PLGO Community has worked in the creation of a collection, where the available items will be added as they appear or be released.

Thanks to P. Stefan Zara, to Claudiu B. Razvan, and Philipos, who was working in the recollection of these items.

Francisco Arriaga.