Robinson. Texts and studies: contributions to Biblical and Patristic literature. Volume 1. 1891.

Previously announced here, the 4 issues of the first volume has been published by Internet Archive, and may be now accessed through the Bibliotheca Pretiosa and Scribd too.

3 items has been digitized at full color, and one of them [THE PASSION OF S. PERPETUA] is available only as microfilm, in b/w images.

The handwritten note in the front-cover of the issue 4 was done not to correct an ‘errata’, but as a misplaced warning to help the readers. The back-cover show that a single page is attached to the 4th. issue, as a main front-page of the whole volume 1; that’s the reason the 4 issues appear listed there:

Vol. I.

No. 1. THE APOLOGY OF ARISTIDES : by J. Rendel Harris, M. A. : with an Appendix by the editor.
No. 2. THE PASSION OF S. PERPETUA, with an Appendix on the Scillitan Martyrdom : by the editor.
No. 3. THE LORD’S PRAYER IN THE EARLY CHURCH : by F. H. Chase, B. D.
No. 4. THE FRAGMENTS OF HERACLEON : by A. E. Brooke, M. A.

Harris, Robinson. The Apology of Aristides on behalf of the Christians : from a Syriac ms. preserved on Mou… by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Robinson. The Passion of S. Perpetua [microform]. 1891. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Chase. The Lord's prayer in the early church. 1891. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Robinson. Texts and studies : contributions to Biblical and Patristic literature. 1891. Volume 1. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

De Aldama. Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística. 1963.

Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística (1963)

Author: Aldama, José Antonio de
Subject: Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Fathers of the church
Publisher: Granada, Facultad de Teología
Language: Spanish
Call number: BT612 .A355
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: majorityworldcollection; Princeton; americana

De Aldama. Virgo mater; estudios de teología patrística. 1963. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Díaz y Díaz [Comp.]. Isidoriana; colección de estudios sobre Isidoro de Sevilla. 1961.

Isidoriana; colección de estudios sobre Isidoro de Sevilla (1961)

Author: Díaz y Díaz, Manuel C., comp
Subject: Isidore, of Seville, Saint, d. 636
Publisher: León, Centro de Estudios “San Isidro,”
Language: Spanish; English; French; German; Italian
Call number: BX4700.I78 D52 1961
Digitizing sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Book contributor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Collection: majorityworldcollection; Princeton; americana

Díaz y Díaz (Comp.). Isidoriana; Colección de estudios sobre Isidoro de Sevilla. 1961. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Quote. Robert M. Grant. ‘Early Christians and Animals’, Ch. 4, “Alexandrians and the Phisiologus”, 3: Clement. 1999.

The primary work of Clement of Alexandria, in eight books, was his Stromateis or Miscellanies. Like Aelian, he used a good source (an epitome of Aristotle’s History of Animals by Aristophanes of Byzantium), but added a good deal of erudite nonsense. As an Alexandrian, Clement is naturally concerned with Egyptian matters. He refers to “the gods of Egypt such as cats and weasels,” as well as “cat or crocodile or native snake.” On a literary level he analyzes Egyptian writing as epistolographic (= demotic) or hieratic or hieroglyphic. There are two kinds of hieroglyphs, literal and symbolical, while the symbolical in turn is divided into three: (1) literal by imitation (the sun is a circle, the moon looks like a moon), (2) figurative, and (3) allegorical using enigmas. He illustrates the third type by stars depicted as snakes because of their oblique orbits, the sun as a beetle because it fashions a ball of ox-dung and rolls it before its face. Later he discusses the symbolical meanings of animals in the hieroglyphs. Some Egyptians show the sun on a ship, others on a crocodile; they mean that the sun generates time, or else that the crocodile symbolizes time. On the sacred Pylon at Diospolis there was a boy, the symbol of generation, and an old man, decay. A hawk was the symbol of God, a fish of hatred, while the crocodile can mean shamelessness. Taken together, the symbols mean this: “You who are born and die, God hates shamelessness.” (This last account is close to Plutarch, except that he locates the carving in the temple of Athena at Sais and identifies the shameless animal as the hippopotamus.) In addition, the lion symbolizes strength and vigor; the ox, agriculture and nourishment; the horse, courage and boldness; the sphinx, strength with understanding, for it has the body of a lion, the face of a man. A man symbolizes intelligence, memory, power, and art. In the processions of the gods they carry gold images: two dogs, one hawk, and one ibis. The dogs symbolize two hemispheres; the hawk the sun, the ibis the moon; or else the dogs are the tropics, the hawk the equinoctial line, and the ibis the ecliptic. The errors in this exegesis are comparable only to those in the Hieroglyphics of Horapollo, who wrote several centuries after Clement, but relied on similar sources. Both authors took the symbols seriously but did not know what they meant.

When Clement attacked anthropomorphists who held that God literally enjoys smelling the smoke of sacrifices (Gen. 8:21), he turned to natural history for analogies. Do insects breathe or not? Clement marshalled a scientific account of breathing, to combat the idea that God breathes. Aristotle (On Respiration) had argued that insects do not breathe because when centipedes are cut up the parts stay alive, and flies and bees can swim in liquid for a long time. On the other hand, in his History of Animals he noted that all insects die if covered with oil, a point suggesting that they do breathe. Clement deals with the question by defining terms. Plants are nourished from the density of the air, while hibernating bears are nourished from the exhalation arising from their own bodies. Demons ventilate internally (diapneitai). Fish inhale (empneitai) through the dilation of their gills. Insects circumspire (peripneitai) through pressure of membranes on the waist. Finally, there are creatures that inhale (anapnei) by rhythmic beats corresponding to the counter-dilation (anti-diastole) of the lungs against the chest. A little later, Clement notes that land animals and birds inhale as human beings do, though fish breathe the air infused into the water at the creation. Theophilus too had remarked on this infusion.

Clement dealt with diet from points of view both moral and philosophical. He quoted Paul as saying, “It is good not to eat meat or drink wine” (shortened from Romans 14:21), in agreement with the Pythagoreans – for whose opinions he quotes the Stoic Musonius Rufus: “meat, though appropriate for wild animals, darkens the soul.” He adds, however, that he who eats meat sparingly does not sin. In his view the best diet consists of bulbs, olives, herbs, milk, cheese, fruits, and “all kinds of cooked food without sauces.” (The list comes from Plato through Plutarch.) But Clement is willing to include meat, preferably roasted, not boiled. He cites the frugal disciples, who offered the risen Lord “a piece of broiled fish, which he ate before them” (Luke 24:42–43).

In a later work Clement reflects deeper concerns. Christians can abstain from meat on reasonable grounds, not the Pythagorean dream about the transmigration of souls. One might abstain because animal meat has “already been assimilated to the souls of irrational creatures.” In addition, wine and meat harm the mind, as (the Pythagorean) Androcydes said. Similarly one of the late second-century Sayings of Sextus, authoritative for both Clement and Origen, claims that though abstinence is more rational, eating animate beings is really a matter of indifference.

Egyptian priests in their purifications abstain from meat and fish, for “such food makes the flesh flabby.” Elsewhere Clement lists a few fishes “venerated” at various places: one kind at Syene, another at Elephantine, yet another at Oxyrhynchus. This kind of information reflects the interests of the age, not those of Christians generally save for the literary-minded author himself.

He also tells how some Phoenician Syrians “venerate” fishes, while Porphyry mentions Syrians in general, as well as initiates into the mysteries at Eleusis. The Christian apologist Athenagoras says Syrians “venerate” fish because of the mythical Derceto (who had a fish’s tail). “Venerate” again means “not eat.”

Clement identifies the serpent with the devil but usually, after Philo, relates his work to pleasure. He adds that the serpent is now the cause of idol-worship, and acts like barbarians who bind their captives to corpses. The simile comes from the Exhortation of Aristotle, but Clement obviously makes it his own.

Since Clement knew something of zoology he could question animal lore, either tacitly or explicitly. In his Miscellanies he paraphrases much of the letter of “the apostle Clement,” but not the section about the phoenix, a bird he mentions elsewhere only as an Egyptian astrological symbol. Presumably he did not accept the story. When he commented on Barnabas, whom he regarded as an apostle, he relied on Aristotle for questioning the story about the hyena, though without naming either the apostle or the philosopher. He agreed with Barnabas that Moses spoke allegorically but rejected his ideas about what he meant. “I do not agree with this exegesis of what was said symbolically.” Closer to Aristotle than to Barnabas, Clement says the hare really has a bifurcated uterus. And as for the weasel, the Hellenistic Jewish Epistle of Aristeas said that the weasel conceives through the ear and gives birth through the mouth; Plutarch states that “many suppose and say that the weasel conceives through the ear and gives birth through the mouth.” Harnack and others thought Zeno of Verona was expressing a like thought when he said that “Christ enters Mary through the ear.” They did not notice that Zeno was simply giving allegorical exegesis of the angel’s speaking a word to her, just as when he said that the devil crept into Eve through her ear. This was not Barnabas’ notion. The author of the Clementine Recognitions rather sensibly supposed that these unusual habits prove that the Creator specifically chose the usual modes of conception and birth as norms. The Physiologus, as usual, went back to gossip, claiming that the hyena is androgynous, alternating sexes, while the weasel conceives through the mouth and gives birth through the ears. The latter statement simply reverses Aristeas’ notion.

Robert M. Grant. ‘Early Christians and Animals’, Ch. 4, “Alexandrians and the Phisiologus”, 3: Clement, pp. 46.48. Routledge, 1999.

Charpentier. Etudes sur les Peres de l’Eglise. 1853.

Etudes sur les Peres de l’Eglise (1853)

Author: Charpentier, Jean Pierre, 1797-1878
Volumes: 2
Subject: Littérature chrétienne primitive; Pères de l’Église
Publisher: Paris : Veuve Maire-Nyon
Language: French
Call number: br67.c463
Digitizing sponsor: University of Toronto
Book contributor: University of Ottawa
Collection: universityofottawa; toronto

Charpentier. Etudes sur les Peres de l'Eglise. 1853. Volume 1. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis


Charpentier. Etudes sur les Peres de l'Eglise. 1853. Volume 2. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Sedgefield. King Alfred’s Old English version of Boethius De consolatione philosophiae. 1899.

King Alfred’s Old English version of

Boethius

De consolatione philosophiae

(1899)

Author: Boethius, d. 524; Alfred, King of England, 849-899; Sedgefield, Walter John, 1866-?
Subject:
Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press
Language: English
Call number: AJZ-5325
Book contributor: Kelly – University of Toronto
Collection: toronto

Sedgefield. King Alfred's Old English version of Boethius De consolatione philosophiae. 1899. by Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis

Article. Il Vaticano II all’interno della «traditio ecclesiae»: La prospettiva patristica. Daniele Gianotti. 2012

Il Vaticano II all’interno della «traditio ecclesiae».
La prospettiva patristica.
Daniele Gianotti
Rivista di scienze religiose
(Molfetta), 26 (2012) 329-346

Sommario:

Il contributo si propone di indicare i tratti principali dell’influsso avuto sul concilio Vaticano II dal «ressourcement» patristico del Novecento. Dopo aver richiamato le discussioni in merito alla vigilia del Vaticano II e nei primi dibattiti conciliari, vengono indicati tre snodi centrali, nei quali il riferimento ai Padri della Chiesa ha giocato un ruolo importante: l’inizio della discussione sul de Ecclesia, l’adozione dello «schema Philips», il dibattito sulla collegialità episcopale. Nella parte conclusiva, vengono indicati alcuni aspetti più significativi dell’ecclesiologia patristica accolta dal Vaticano II.

Article available here.

Becker. Isidori Hispalensis De natvra rervm liber. 1857.

Isidori Hispalensis De natvra rervm liber;

(1857)

Author: Isidore, of Seville, Saint, d. 636; Becker, Gustav Heinrich, 1833-1886, ed
Subject: Meteorology; Astronomy
Publisher: Berolini, Weidmanni svmptvs fecervnt
Language: Latin
Call number: 9662797
Digitizing sponsor: The Library of Congress
Book contributor: The Library of Congress
Collection: library_of_congress; americana

Becker. Isidori Hispalensis De natvra rervm liber. 1857.

Watts. St. Augustine’s Confessions : with an English translation. 1912.

St. Augustine’s Confessions :

with an English translation (1912)

Author: Augustine, Saint, Bishop of Hippo; Watts, William, 1590?-1649; Rouse, W. H. D. (William Henry Denham), 1863-1950
Volumes: 2
Publisher: London : W. Heinemann ; Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT
Language: English
Call number: SRLF_UCLA:LAGE-5959408
Digitizing sponsor: Internet Archive
Book contributor: University of California Libraries
Collection: cdl; americana

Watts. St. Augustine's Confessions : with an English translation. 1912. Volume 1.

Watts. St. Augustine's Confessions : with an English translation. 1912. Volume 2.

Gumerlock. Mark 13:32 and Christ’s Supposed Ignorance: Four Patristic Solutions. 2007.

Trinity Journal 28 (2007):205-213
Mark 13:32 and Christ’s Supposed Ignorance:
Four Patristic Solutions

THE PROBLEM OF CHRIST’S SUPPOSED IGNORANCE

Referring to the time of His Second Coming, Jesus is recorded as saying, “But of
that day or hour, no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but the Father
alone” (Mark 13:32, NASB. The word alone is italicized because it was supplied by the
translator). The church fathers spilled much ink explaining this statement of the Lord,
most often because of its import regarding Christology.2 Since the passage allegedly
presents Christ as ignorant, the Arians of the early church, who denied that the Son was
consubstantial with the Father, used it as a proof-text for their belief in a less-than-divine
Son of God.3 On the other hand, those who held to Nicene orthodoxy and believed that
Jesus was fully God and possessed all the attributes of divinity, including omniscience,
responded to the Arians with Colossians 3:2, “In Him are all the treasures of wisdom and
knowledge.” The adherents of Nicene orthodoxy, besides asserting Christ’s omniscience,
also had to make sense out of Mark 13:32, which seemed to teach that Jesus was ignorant
of at least one detail concerning the future, i.e. the time of His return. To solve the
theological dilemma of the omniscient Son of God not knowing the time of His own
Second Coming, the church fathers proposed a variety of explanations. This article
presents and evaluates four of their solutions—the philological solution of Basil of
Caesarea, two “figures of speech” solutions offered by Augustine of Hippo and Gregory
of Tours respectively, and the anthropological solution of Athanasius of Alexandria.

Article kindly provided by Francis X. Gumerlock, through his website.

Q. Septimii Florentis Tertulliani… Operum, tomus primus & secundus [Audoënum Parvum, Ed.]. 1566.

Q. SEPTIMII

FLORENTIS TERTVL-
LIANI, CARTHAGINENSIS
prefbyteri, autoris antiquiffimi
ac doctiffimi operum,

TOMUS PRIMUS [ET SECUNDUS].

Ad complures veteres è Gallieanis Germanicifque
bibliothecis conquifitos codices recognitus, in qui-
bus præcipuus fuit vnus longè incorruptiffi-
mus in vltimam vfque petitus Bri-
tanniam: non omiffis accuratis
BEATI RHENANI
Annotationibus.

Catalogum autem aperiet verfa pagina.

Accebit & Index copiofior.

PARISIIS,

Apud Audoënum Paruum, fub interfignio Lilij
Aurei, via ad D. Iacobum.
1566.

Identifiant pérenne de la notice : http://www.sudoc.fr/100327192

Titre : Q. Septimii Florentis Tertulliani… Operum, tomus primus [-secundus]
Alphabet du titre : latin
Auteur(s) : Tertullien (0155?-0222?). Auteur
Gelenius, Sigismundus (1497-1554). Éditeur scientifique
Rhenanus, Beatus (1485-1547). Notes
Thurzo, Stanislaus von (1471-1540). Dédicataire
Petit, Oudin (15..-1572). Éditeur commercial
Wechel, André (15..-1581). Imprimeur / Imprimeur-libraire
Pamèle, Jacques de (1536-1587). Ancien possesseur
Date(s) : 1566
Langue(s) : latin
Pays : France
Editeur(s) : Parisiis, apud Audoënum Parvum, sub intersignio lilii aurei, via ad D. Jacobum. 1566
Description : 2 t. ([110-2bl.]-760 p. ; [61-3bl.]-751-[1bl.] p.) : ill. gr.s.b. ; in-8
Contient : Vita Q. Septimi Florentis Tertulliani, per Beatum Rhenanum
Notes : Avis au lecteur par Sigismundus Gelenius, table des matières, préface dédiée à Stanislaus von Thurzo par Beatus Rhenanus, datée de Bâle le 1er juillet 1521, index (t.1) ; table des matières, index (t.2). – Marque aux titres [Renouard (Marques) 908], bandeaux, lettrines. – Sign. ã8 ẽ8 ĩ8 õ8 ũ8 2ã8 2ẽ8 a-3a8 3b4 ; [-]8 β8 γ8 [-]8 A-3A8. – BN Cat. gén.. – STC French books, 1470-1600. – Adams. – P. Petitmengin, “Jacques de Pamèle, passeur de manuscrits perdus de Tertullien” dans “Passeurs de textes” dir. Y. Sordet, 2009, (n. 15-16 : exemplaire de la BSG). – Reproduction du tome 1 (Fac-similé numérique de l’exemplaire conservé à la BSG sous la cote : 8 CC 1097 INV 1046 RES). – Reproduction du tome 2 (Fac-similé numérique de l’exemplaire conservé à la BSG sous la cote : 8 CC 1098 INV 1047 RES)
Autre(s) titre(s) : Operum, tomus primus [-secundus]
Ville d’édition : Paris

Origine de la notice : BSG/AIC-SAFIG

  1. Tomus I.
  2. Tomus II.

Cureton. Corpus Ignatianum : a complete collection of the Ignatian epistles, genuine, interpolated, and spurious. 1849.

Corpus Ignatianum :

a complete collection of the Ignatian epistles,

genuine, interpolated, and spurious …

(1849)

Author: Ignatius, Saint, Bishop of Antioch, d. ca. 110
Publisher: Berlin : Asher
Language: English
Call number: ALG-4438
Digitizing sponsor: University of Toronto
Book contributor: PIMS – University of Toronto
Collection: pimslibrary; toronto